Antique Tintype Photographs

Tintype photo of two Victorian women posing under an “arched column” – great photo prop. Some creasing and general wear. Image is good. Tintype photo of a baby with a hidden mother awkwardly posed to the side under a striped blanket. This is quirky, fun and odd. It looks like her face was poorly rubbed out. Not a sophisticated portrait! Some wear, especially around border. Tintype photo of two women with great hairstyles, Victorian fashion and accessories. Condition is good with some wear.

Types of Photograph

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The tintype was a variation of the ambrotype, but instead of a glass plate, a thin sheet of I’m dating the photographs between and

Although not exactly like pictures we encounter today, tintype photographs set the stage for photography in our era. Tintypes began in when an Ohio chemistry professor Hamilton Smith patented the tintype image. Before tintypes existed, the two main types of photographic images, the daguerreotype and the ambrotype, were created by treating glass with light sensitive collodin. The process to create these images was expensive and difficult.

When tintypes became available commercially, photographers were easily swayed by the durability, inexpensiveness, and easier emulsion process of the tintype which led to the downfall of images on glass. Tintype images are taken on iron plates which are treated with an enamel to prevent rusting. Earlier tintypes are noted to be treated with a black enamel while later ones were treated with a brown enamel.

When taking the image, no flash or click of a button was involved. The cap of the camera was removed and the person sat still in front of the camera while the treated iron plate captured a very underexposed dark image. The image would then be blacked by the enameling and coated with a collodion emulsion. The result, an image that appeared as the person waited.

Tintype is nobody famous so its value is limited

We all have old family photos. These may be loose or in albums or they may be in the form of postcards or even fragile black and grey glass negatives. So what about dating? Photography started in but at that time was really in the hands of a few scientists, professionals or wealthy amateurs.

– The earliest tintypes were on heavy metal .0 1 7 inches) The stamps date these photographs to the period of the wartime retail.

The treatments, methods, or techniques described herein are provided for informational purposes. The reader assumes responsibility for any application results or interpretation of information. Main Period of Use: Throughout the 19th century. Very popular with street photographers, particularly during the American Civil War.

Historic Practioners: The process was commonly used by portraitists and street photographers. Shadows are the varnished support.

Care of Encased Photographic Images – Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI) Notes 16/1

The Mirror of Race website provides basic information about each of the images displayed in its on-line exhibition. This information is fairly standard in any art-historical scholarship, but those new to this topic may want some further explanation of the terms. MAKER: Each images had its maker, of course, but it is worth keeping several things in mind about this. First of all, the early forms of photographic process the daguerreotype, the ambrotype, the tintype and the albumen print, to name the most common ones were very difficult to learn and perform, expensive in terms of their equipment and apparatus, and sometimes very dangerous for example, developing a daguerreotype requires heating up mercury until it gives off fumes, and the wet-plate processes include chemicals that can — and often did — explode if improperly handled.

Whether using the wet or dry technique, the end result remains the same. Tintype Photography. Group portrait taken at Pease’s Nantasket, date.

The photographs are all sizes. Some are obviously older photographs. Who are the individuals in the photographs? Are the individuals family members? Most likely, but if not, the photograph was obviously treasured to have been kept throughout the years. Who owned the photograph s before you? How did the photograph s come into your possession? The answers to these questions can narrow down which side of the family the photograph s belonged.

Email and social media make it easier to contact more distant relatives. Reach out to those distant cousins. Skipping this step is tempting, but avoid that temptation! Could the photograph s be of her sisters, parents, or cousins? Check with your cousins, aunts, uncles….

How to Identify an Old Tintype Photo

The term “case photograph” describes three types of 19th-century photographs that were generally kept in cases which were both decorative and protective. They are the daguerreotype , named after its inventor L. Daguerre; the ambrotype; and the tintype or ferrotype. Daguerreotypes were introduced in in Paris, France, constituting for some photo-historians the beginning of photography.

Ambrotypes and tintypes, made by the wet collodion process, originated in the s. Daguerreotypes continued to be made into the s.

19th Century Photo Types: A Breakdown to Help You Date Old Family Pictures plate holding the positive image to distinguish a tintype from an ambrotype.

Bring it to Dr. The earliest form of photography is the daguerreotype. The only problems with daguerreotypes was that they were expensive, labor intensive, and time consuming to produce. In the early s, daguerreotypes were replaced by a cheaper alternative called the ambrotype. Ambrotypes were the brainchild of Frederick Scott Archer. Ambrotypes became popular in the Victorian period from the late s until the s.

An ambrotype image is a negative placed on a piece of glass which is then hosted on a black background.

How to Date Your Old Photos

It’s best to search for ancestors by entering one term in the search box below such as surname, a city or town, a county, a state, a country or a keyword such as England, Civil War, CDV, Minnesota, Pennsylvania etc. Pearce’s Algonquin Bon Ton Tent. Collection of author. A wonderful early advertising piece for the traveling photographer tent of W. Cheney tintype photo below. This appears to have been written in the ‘s, probably by a daughter or son, or other family member of Mary’s.

Fantastic hand colored antique tintype photo of a man and woman couple. This portrait is truly wonderful and would look fabulous in a frame. This dates circa.

After an absence of several years, fake tintypes are being seen again in increasing numbers. Previously found primarily in flea markets and malls, the new generation of fakes has spread to the Internet. Subjects of the fakes are similar to before: Civil War soldiers, native Americans, and 19th century historical figures. One new category to the latest batch reported Maine Antique Digest June is blacks with a black mammy with white children being the most frequently seen.

Authentic tintypes date from the late s. First, a sheet of iron would be covered with black lacquer. Then it would be coated with emulsion and exposed in the camera. Earlier daguerreotypes and ambrotypes were on copper and glass plates and had to be protected in cases. Iron plates of the tintype produced a much more durable image and could be kept in paper folders. This lowered their cost and made them affordable to more people.

They could also be sent through the mail which opened up the tourist and traveler market like Civil War soldiers. From their first invention, tintypes were always made from iron sheets, never tin.

Making a Tintype


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